Wednesday, May 4, 2011

Soft Glow of Lantern Light [My Modern Metropolis]

Soft Glow of Lantern Light: "

Mark Boyle first started painting when he was just 11 years old. His parents had him tutored by some local artists who gave him a solid head start. 'A person who really taught good basics was Carl Christophersen.' he says. 'In painting lessons, Carl taught me to divide objects into shapes and planes with hard and soft edges.' As an artist, he'd later face challenges along the way, particularly with the weather, but he lightheartedly saw these moments as amusing and coming with the territory.



Boyle uses oil, pastels and watercolor to create beautiful paintings that can be appreciated by young and old alike. His choice of colors, especially in making water or light, is truly masterful.



Boyle let us in on his world by answering a few questions we sent his way. Read that short Q&A below after enjoying this lovely set he refers to as Figurative.





















You've said 'Nature impassions me' and that you use past trips as references for your work. What do you look for when you're on your trips? Are you searching for that perfect landscape?

It is the outdoor experience like when you have backpacked into a remote place experienced the crackling campfire while watching the fading sun cast its last glow on the mountains and alpine lake in front of you or Clamdiggers lighting their lantern at and evening low tide as a storm clears on the horizon. Within these experiences I try to capture the excitement of the moment while using a design eye and elements that will form good composition in a painting.



I love how your Figurative set has glowing lights. What does this light represent to you?

Painting a warm glowing lantern against a cool background light represents a Yin and Yang balance. It also could be a symbolic representation for some of spiritual balance of light versus dark etc. The best mood is made about 45 minutes after sunset when the night is nearly full on but still visible.



Is there any advice you could give to aspiring artists?

Paint not only something because it will sell but also paint what you love to do and what makes you happy or excited...to please yourself only. You will find an inspired painting you enjoy doing will turn out better than one to make a living and make sales.



Mark Boyle's website"

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